Make a String Phone - Fun Science Projects for Kids

 

science telephone experiments

Apr 25,  · Science Fair Project Ideas for Kids, "Cell Phone Science Fair Projects and Experiments" "Science Fair Project and Experiments" "Cell phone radiation levels" "Second hand cell phone radiation" "Cell phone and Reaction Time" Photo Credits. cell phone in macro image by Alexey Klementiev from eancodnes.tk;. Make phones using two tin cans and string. Listen as sound travels from inside one tin can along the string and into the other tin can. A simple telephone. Your phone can measure acceleration, magnetic field, sound, location, and maybe more—which turns it into a portable data collector for science projects.


Three Science Experiments You Can Do With Your Phone | WIRED


Introduction Have you ever tried to have a conversation with someone so far away that you couldn't really hear each other? Without yelling, it's hard to have a conversation over long distances. So these days it's nice to be able to use telephones to talk with someone—whether he or she is yards or miles away. Back before there were cell phones or even cordless phones, all telephones were hooked up to wires that helped to carry the sound of a person's voice via an electric signal.

And you can use the same concept to build your own telephone using just cups and some string. What message are you going to share over the string? Background When we talk, our vocal cords make molecules in the air vibrate. You can feel the vibrations by holding your hand against your throat while you talk.

Those vibrating air science telephone experiments make other air molecules around them vibrate, and so on, science telephone experiments, which is how science telephone experiments travels through the air.

Different pitches of sound move in waves that have different spacing between them—or "frequency. Inside our ears are tiny sensitive hairs, science telephone experiments. They pick up the vibrations and transmit that information to our brains, which interpret it as sound. The brain interprets sounds as having different pitches, or tones, based on the frequency, or spacing, of the waves.

But the particles in air are spread out from one another more than particles in a liquid or solid. So sound vibrations tend to peter out before they travel very far. Having a soft connective material, such as cotton string—which has a higher density, or number of molecules in a given science telephone experiments of space, than air—can help the sound waves move over a greater distance. Can he or she hear you?

Is the cup-and-string telephone still effective? Can you hear as well? Will the sound still carry through? Why or why not? How do different materials change the quality of sound or how far the sound will travel? Observations and results Could you hear your partner better using the cups and tight string than if you were speaking to each other in the same volume over the air?

In this activity, your voice vibrated the air inside of the cup, which in turn made the bottom of the cup vibrate. These vibrations were transferred to the string and then into the bottom of your partner's cup, which made the air inside of his or her cup vibrate and become detectable sound.

When the string goes slack, science telephone experiments, the vibrations dissipate more easily and get lost along the way. Landline phones work on the same idea but they transfer the sound waves into an electrical signal, science telephone experiments, which can travel even farther over wires—and the landlines don't have to be kept taut.

Sound, such as human speech, travels science telephone experiments incredibly small waves—incredibly fast about 1, science telephone experiments, feet per secondwhich is why you couldn't see it or detect a delay while it traveled across the cups and string. Have you ever noticed how things sound different underwater? Because water's molecules are packed together more closely than those in air, sound waves move more easily—faster and farther—under water. Whales and other marine animals that use sound to communicate under water take advantage of this fact.

Scientists think whales can hear each other from hundreds and maybe even thousands of miles away—without even a string telephone! Science telephone experiments your string telephone observations and results! Leave a comment below or share science telephone experiments photos and feedback on Scientific American 's Facebook page.

Cleanup Untie or cut the string from the paperclips or toothpicks. Recycle or reuse what materials you can. You have free article s left. Already a subscriber? Sign in. See Subscription Options. Key concepts Sound Waves Hearing From National Science Education Standards : Transfer of energy Introduction Have you ever tried to have a conversation with someone so far away that you couldn't really hear each other?

Read on for observations, science telephone experiments, results and more resources. Get smart. Sign up for our email newsletter. Sign Up. Self-Awareness or Illusion?

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Kids Senses - Tin Can Phones - Sound Travels from Childrens Science Experiments

 

science telephone experiments

 

May 06,  · Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and Talk through a String Telephone. Bring Science Home: Activity easy experiments in Author: Katherine Harmon. Your phone can measure acceleration, magnetic field, sound, location, and maybe more—which turns it into a portable data collector for science projects. Apr 25,  · Science Fair Project Ideas for Kids, "Cell Phone Science Fair Projects and Experiments" "Science Fair Project and Experiments" "Cell phone radiation levels" "Second hand cell phone radiation" "Cell phone and Reaction Time" Photo Credits. cell phone in macro image by Alexey Klementiev from eancodnes.tk;.